Howard Hewitt To Perform At The Courier Eco Latino Newspaper’s Community Service Awards Event

For twelve years the Courier / Eco Latino newspaper has provided the Tri-City and specifically the African-American and Hispanic communities with a publication of positive, quality of life information.

 

We celebrate our twelfth anniversary with our signature event, “The Community Service Awards” which gives past due recognition to individuals or organizations for their distinguished service to the African-American, Hispanic and other minority communities.

 

Once again our event this year will be held at the Columbus Convention and Trade Center on Saturday July 22, 2017 beginning at 6:30 pm. The program, which includes dinner, is two-fold, an awards program recognizing individuals or organizations of Columbus, Phenix City and Fort Benning followed by a performance featuring national recording artist Howard Hewitt.

 

Other musical guests will include Anthony Parkman, Chris Kelly, Carlos Bellavista and a special Tibute to Prince.

 

In addition to our “Publishers Award” we will present  our 2nd Annual Community Servant Award” to a Hispanic individual or organization in honor of Harold “Lefty” Encarnacion, a well-known and beloved Hispanic businessman who passed away October of 2015.

 

Tickets are available for $40 until June 15th after which they will be $50. Reserved VIP tables are available for $360. Tickets may be purchased at the Courier Eco Latino office at 1300 Wynnton Rd, Ste. 104 or by calling 706.225.0106

 

Howard Hewitt

 

The group Shalamar had an enviable career at the height of the disco era, with several charting dance hits and a high, gleaming profile. After the successful solo departure of fellow vocalist Jody Watley, Howard Hewett split with the group in 1986 to explore his own career. He released several well-received albums of soulful, gospel-tinged R&B, heavy on the romantic slow jams, and contributed to albums by several jazz fusion artists who made use of his supple, multi-octave voice. In 2001, he channeled his church-music influences into a full-on gospel album (and a live follow-up of the same material), creating an even wider fan base for his intimate, passionate crooning.